Robaato's Corner

Jul 24

What Is Cryamore Up To These Days?

cryamore:

Hello, fellow future Cryatists! Been worried about Cryamore? Have you been sweating as profusely as our 3 lovable siblings above? Well, don’t be! We have a new pretty lengthy update for you! Have a new song by Aivi while you read this one. It’s the Rime Rapids (Water Dungeon) at…

super huge update today on the Cryamore Kickstarter/Tumblr. Please check it out!!

dperez725 said: Anymore openings for the $80 slots of ur sketch book in the near future ?

Nope, I won’t be opening any new perks/slots on this campaign. 

Jul 23

There’s a heck of a lot of Chun-Li in this book…
177 Preorders, 16 Days left! Remember to grab yourself a copy!

There’s a heck of a lot of Chun-Li in this book…

177 Preorders, 16 Days left! Remember to grab yourself a copy!

johnson20xx said: I'd always seen your work around and really enjoyed the shading and color theory, but I really became a fan after reading your journals. Reading them has lightened my struggle. I'll keep on drawing, I just wanted to say thank you for working so hard and sharing your perspective.

Ah man, glad to hear it! I really appreciate that and I’m happy that my ramblings get others to get back in the game! It’s a never-ending journey, might as well keep truckin’ it! :D

churchsoho said: Hello Rob. I'm creating my first illustration portfolio but I'm beginning to worry about the interface more than the actual body of work. I'm an okay artsy guy but am pretty bad at design. I'm afraid that the design of the actual portfolio interface might impact horribly on the skills that I am actually trying to sell. I was wondering in your experience to what degree would this aspect of my portfolio impact me? Also for a digital portfolio what is the best format to use? Thanks in advance.

If you’re starting out now, I’d suggest trying out Behance. It seems like a pretty solid place to have a portfolio and where clients are constantly checking for work. I would join the site but I don’t feel like having another place to post, LOL. 

You can also just have a solid, clean blog and post just your art there as well. Try grabbing or buying a Tumblr theme that has on a portfolio showcase-style layout. There’s no need to have your own central, designed site these days, but there’s nothing wrong with making one if you’d like.

That should be enough to get you running. Hope it helps!

marowowe said: I've always admired how quickly you draw amazing things, so thank you for that advice post!! Can you share the settings you use to go from 200 to 300dpi? Or do you go from 100 straight to 300 when you know your work will be printed?

Cheers! I go straight to 300 DPI when I’m going to color if it’s designated for print. 

For 200 to 300 DPI, just resize in increments of 50 at Bicubic Smoother (250DPI, Bicubic Smoother > 300DPI, Bicubic Smoother).

Jul 22

Digital Art Tip: Resolution Dependence -

erikmcclure:

robscorner:

I get the question often as to what size canvas I draw on. I’ve answered in responses to explain the basics numerous times, but I’m going to write a bit more detailed response so all can understand and reference.

image

(I’ll use my Dirty Pair piece as the guinea pig for this…


Pixels don’t work like this.

What was mentioned here actually does work, but for completely different reasons. The larger the image is, the more difficult it is for the computer to handle. If your picture is too big, windows will flip out and you’ll get lag on your tablet, which makes things harder to draw. In addition, at high DPIs, the effective brush size keeps going up. If your brush size is too large, the computer can’t process all the pixels fast enough (usually due to RAM transfer speeds), and you will get lag, which makes it harder to draw smooth lines.

It has nothing to do with “drawing distance,” unless you’re actually zooming in to 100%, in which case the advice you should really follow is “don’t zoom in that much”. It’s just a technological limitation - if you’re computer can’t handle your effective brush size, lower the DPI. If it can, raise the DPI. That’s it. The technique outlined is useful if you can’t afford to draw at a DPI you prefer, but you can’t get back lost information. You should always draw at the highest DPI your computer can handle smoothly, which will change if you upgrade your computer. It has nothing to do with “drawing distance”. If we had computers that operated at the speed of light, you’d be able to get lines that look just as smooth at 10000000 DPI.

That said, the sharpening technique here does work when your technology limits you to a low DPI, but I want to make sure everyone understands that this is simply a workaround for insufficient computational power, not some law of digital art.

I have 64GB of RAM, so this isn’t about computational power at all. 

On a moderate computer, (which is basically anything you can pick up at a store for a reasonable price) you don’t get lag when you’re drawing at a high resolution (unless you’re running a crap ton of software while arting). You are working with more distance. if you increase an 5x5 image by two, you are essentially making the image 10x10. Drawing the same curve at the same zoom ratio takes much more care in the 10x10 document than in the 5x5 document because you are working with more pixels; I bet on that with confidence. I draw fast and I’ve tested this countless times over the course of 5 years. There is a difference.

(No one said this is “law”, it’s just a different process. You don’t have to shoot it down like it is. I’ve churned out professional-grade illustrations with this method and it’s very effective. Or else I wouldn’t have written this or one would only see half the amount of art that I produce efficiently in my galleries. It takes more effort and time to draw at a larger resolution. That’s a fact. Don’t make a false claim stating “pixels don’t work like this” when they do, especially when I have the experience firsthand to back it.)

If you make an illustration in 8.5x11 inches at 150 DPI and print the document on an 8.5x11 inch piece of paper, there will be no difference in quality as if you’ve done it in 72 DPI because the measurements are the same. It will come out exactly as you draw it on the screen:

The above gif is the same real-world sized document. One is 72DPI, the other is 150DPI. The zoom is at Print Size, which is the result and end-all of what you need to worry about. The line in the middle is the drawn line. There is literally no difference between the 4px brush with the 8px brush. If you print the 72DPI one on an 8.5x11 piece of paper, it will print out exactly the same as the 150DPI one. The viewer will not be able to tell the difference. Now if you take this document and try to print on an 11x17 piece of paper, THEN you will have problems.

As long as your document size is whatever you are going to intend to do with the image, you are fine, as long as you don’t work lower than 72DPI, because then that would be asinine and there aren’t any brushes that can work and divide well at a decent quality. If you’re planning on having a lot of detail in an image, then draw a bit more high resolution. If I have to do a huge composition with a ton of characters, then I’d draw in 200DPI because I can zoom in and work more detailed than I can in 100DPI, but the basic simple illustration does not require that high of a res. I count on it. Even the sharpening trick is just added insurance, but it’s not necessarily needed.

Digital Art Tip: Resolution Dependence -

derpynirvash:

robscorner:

I get the question often as to what size canvas I draw on. I’ve answered in responses to explain the basics numerous times, but I’m going to write a bit more detailed response so all can understand and reference.

image

(I’ll use my Dirty Pair piece as the guinea pig for this…

Please, if you are making work for print, make it natively at 300dpi if you can, even resizing from 200 to 300 dpi will result in a quality shift. 

You can do that if you’re into having 5000x5000 pixel line art and like to do it just for personal achievement, but I have a lot of experience working with print and I can say for an absolute fact that it does not matter unless you’re planning on printing on a billboard. The only person who will know how clean your lines are is you; no one else. If you’re drawing a poster sized image at 300 DPI and posting online at 300 DPI, then yeah, it makes sense. Or again, drawing line art planned to be on a billboard, then sure. But the regular average viewer will not see your lines at that resolution so why work harder?

It’s not the same working 300 DPI and zoomed in at 100% because your lines will jag up even more because your hand is drawing 3x the pixel count at smaller distance. That’s why jaggies happen, because you’re zoomed out too much. It’s not the same as drawing on paper with a pen.

There isn’t a quality shift at all. If I drew this image in 300 DPI and then colored it straight from that, it would look exactly the same as the method I used on it and what you see above (again, I upsized only the line art and then colored at a higher resolution). I’ve done tons of testing on this for my personal work and submitted tons of professional stuff for print and there’s really no difference visually at the final output.

Kyary

Kyary

Digital Art Tip: Resolution Dependence

I get the question often as to what size canvas I draw on. I’ve answered in responses to explain the basics numerous times, but I’m going to write a bit more detailed response so all can understand and reference. 

image

(I’ll use my Dirty Pair piece as the guinea pig for this explanation.)

A lot of artists, primarily painters, typically like to work at a large size for things like detail work. However, this is not necessary. When you think of a traditional painter, they don’t paint at rather huge sizes on whatever they’re illustrating (unless they’re painting a mural or some sort of wall art). 

Crossing over into the digital realm, I abide by that same logic. Unless you’re doing graphic design using vector-based visuals where things need to be crisp and clean, there is no need to draw/paint at a huge size (unless you just want to do it to achieve a visual effect or style).

The few people I’ve told know that I draw at a rather small resolution. My typical canvas size is 11x17 inches at 100 DPI. That equals 1100x1700 pixels total. (This image was drawn even smaller than that, at 1088x1245 pixels.) Why do I draw at such a small size? A few reasons:

  1. Much more control over your strokes. You’re working with fewer pixels at a low pixel count, resulting in less need of detail control. For example, drawing a curved stroke at 200DPI is harder to do than 100DPI because there are 2x the distance of the stroke. 300DPI, 3x the distance; 400DPI, 4x; 500DPI, 5x; you get it. The higher pixel count you have, the more care you have to take (and more ctrl+Zs you have to hit).
  2. Drawing small helps brainstorm. I tend to zoom in before roughing out my drawing, that’s right— at my base canvas size. It’s similar to the traditional thumbnailing approach where you don’t have to worry about details when you’re coming up with your pose. You just draw small, enlarge, draw in more detail, enlarge, rinse and repeat until you have all the detail you need for the illustration and then refine the lines. 
  3. Your drawing speed is faster. Because of the above two reasons, you just don’t make as many mistakes and don’t have to worry about strict control. The byproduct is that your drawing speed increases.

Here are the native lines to the DP illustration below:

image

Click here to view native size

Above is the exact size and resolution I drew these two in. As you can see, it’s not a crazy trick. People ask “How do you get your lines so clean!?” when they’re trying to draw at a huge size. Well, just don’t draw at a huge size. You can zoom in and see that it’s nothing special beyond that:

image

Click here to view native size

It looks hecka pixelated and stuff. 

Now at this point, you’re wondering “well, what if I have to worry about print and just having a huge version on hand in case I want to do something with it later on?” Well, this is answered when I’m ready to color my line art~

When I begin to color the piece, I enlarge it. For my refined illustration work, I usually color at 200DPI. I have a Photoshop Action that I run that resizes my linework to 200DPI. But an experienced digital artist knows that enlarging a low-resolution image results in blurriness. That’s why in that Action I also have a Smart Sharpen filter ran on my lines:

image

What this does is basically make it as if I drew the lines at 200DPI instead of 100DPI:

image

Click here to view native size

Everything carries over and you have crisp clean lines to get into coloring. Even after you color, it’s just enough:

image

Click here to view native size

Blending colors and stuff is even easier to do than at a higher resolution. Even at 200%, it’s not horrible:

image

Click here to view native size

We know 300DPI is the default that you should print at, so then just resize it to 300DPI then:

image

Click here to view native size

So, there’s no need to draw in a large resolution for your art, even when you’re worried about print. Drawing smaller makes your work cleaner and easier to manage and looks great when you enlarge it with the right settings. Photoshop has been advanced enough for some time now to utilize this method well. 

And that’s pretty much it for this explanation! I hope all that made sense.

So go on and try to draw smaller instead of drawing huge. You may notice yourself getting faster and using Undo less often. ;)

Freehand Ai Breakie
(Reminder: I’m making a sketchbook full of scribbles and stuff that you can preorder right now here!)

Freehand Ai Breakie

(Reminder: I’m making a sketchbook full of scribbles and stuff that you can preorder right now here!)

AI

AI

(Source: girl2chick, via gravureheaven)

Jul 21

FEAR IS FREEDOM
CONTROL IS LIBERTY
CONTRADICTION IS TRUTH

FEAR IS FREEDOM

CONTROL IS LIBERTY

CONTRADICTION IS TRUTH

Today’s Akiman’s birthday, so I doodle a Chunny breaksketch for him~ ^ o ^
You want to check out more art from me? Purchase my Sketchbook!

Today’s Akiman’s birthday, so I doodle a Chunny breaksketch for him~ ^ o ^

You want to check out more art from me? Purchase my Sketchbook!